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Carl Robert Arvin

arvin robertCaptain Carl Robert Arvin was born on January 19, 1943 in Ypsilanti, Michigan to Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Arvin. C. Robert Arvin graduated from Ypsilanti High School in 1961 where he excelled as a straight-"A" student, and was named as Valedictorian. Captain Arvin excelled in athletics during High School playing on the varsity football and wrestling teams. In 1961, he wrestled his way to a State high school wrestling championship.During his junior year of High School, Carl earned a High School Honors Science Institue scholarship of $100. He was also Student Council President, and President of his class of 1961. Carl Robert Arvin was accepted to the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1961 as a member of the Corps of Cadets of 1965 where he continued to achieve academic and athletic recognition. In recognition of his achievements, C. Robert Arvin was appointed as the highest ranking cadet in the Corps' chain of command with the title of First Captain and Brigade Commander. Carl Arvin received his commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army in 1965 graduating as the top cadet of 2,770 in the Corps of Cadets

First Lieutenant Arvin began his tour in Thua Thien Province, South Vietnam on May 29, 1967 serving with Advisory Team 162, 7th ARVN Airborne Battalion, Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV). According to a note on the Virtual Wall, "First Lieutenant Arvin received two awards of the Silver Star Medal, the first for an action on September 5, 1967 when the 7th Vietnamese Airborne Battalion...came under intense mortar and small arms fire. Though wounded, Arvin disregarded the fierce fire and was leading his element forward to engage the enemy when his radio operator was also wounded. Arvin dragged the soldier to safety and, undaunted by the perilous circumstances, returned to direct repeated helicopter gunship strikes. He refused his own medical evacuation until the objective was secure and the mission complete.

" The note continues, " After a brief period of hospitalization, First Lieutenant Arvin requested an immediate reeturn to duty. The second award resulted from actions which led to his death, 'On October 8, 1967, his unit was completing a sweep of a suspected enemy base when it encountered an entrenched enemy regiment. Intense enemy fire pinned down Arvin's Battalion in an exposed, untenable position. In full view of the enemy, he valiantly moved through the fire to a forward vantage point. There, as fighting raged about him, he directed extremely accurate, close-range gunship passes onto enemy positions. As he continually moved through fire-swept fields to position himself better to direct the supporting fire, Arvin was mortally wounded. His unremitting attention to duty and superb direction of ground forces and supporting aircraft had enabled his battalion to defeat a strong and determined enemy three times its size.'" First Lieutenant Arvin was promoted posthumously to Captain.

Captain Carl Robert Arvin is survived by his parents, wife and a brother. Captain Arvin is resting in West Point Cemetery with two other 1965 classmates who were killed in Vietnam. He lived 24 years, 8 months and 19 days. In 1988, a new cadet gymnasium at the U.S. Military Academy was named in his honor. Carl Robert Avins name is listed on the Vietnam Memorial in Ypsilanti Township under Ypsilanti. His name also appears on the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, DC on Panel 27E Line 068.

 

(First Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Carl Robert Arvin (OF-104601), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Advisory Team 162, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, in action against the enemy on 5 September 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Captain Arvin was serving as Advisor to the 7th Vietnamese Airborne Battalion when it came under intense mortar and small arms fire. Though wounded, Captain Arvin disregarded the fierce fire and was leading his element forward to engage the enemy when his radio operator was also wounded. Captain Arvin dragged the soldier to safety and, undaunted by the perilous circumstances, returned to direct repeated helicopter gunship strikes. He refused his own medical evacuation until the objective was secure and the mission complete. Captain Arvin's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

*ARVIN, CARL ROBERT (KIA)


(Second Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Carl Robert Arvin (OF-104601), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Advisory Team 162, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, in action against the enemy on 8 October 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date Captain Arvin's unit was completing a sweep of a suspected enemy base when it encountered an entrenched enemy regiment. Intense enemy fire pinned down his battalion in an exposed, untenable position. In full view of the enemy Captain Arvin valiantly moved through the fire to a forward vantage point. There, as fighting raged about him, he directed extremely accurate, close-range gunship passes onto enemy positions. As he continually moved through fire-swept fields to position himself better to direct the supporting fire, Captain Arvin was mortally wounded. His unremitting attention to duty and superb direction of ground forces and supporting aircraft had enabled his battalion to defeat a strong and determined enemy three times its size. Captain Arvin's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

The Wall rubbing by John Kinzinger

arvin
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Click On The Above Bronze Plaque To Enlarge
Above Images Credit | Dr. W. Roeser -  He Visited West Point In 2008 When Eastern Michigan University Played Army
Army Won 17 To 13

Curt Lewis
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My friend
3194, maranatha, prescott, az., 86301, usa
Hi Bob, it is me, Curt Lewis. Remember when you used to wrestle with me and Dave? I sure, miss you, Ill always remember the fine example of a real, leader you were hope we meet some time. Curt
Wednesday, June 02, 1999