Grady Merril Jordan

  wwiivictory koreanserviceth vietnam-medal    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sergeant First Class Grady Merril Jordan was born on July 25, 1915 in Benton, Arkansas.

army_logoSergeant First Class Jordan enlisted in the United States Army on July 22, 1940 beginning a 26 year career in the Army. Grady served in World War II where he earned the American Defense Service Medal, Honorable Lapel Button, the European-African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with one Silver Service Star and three Bronze Service Stars, and the World War II Victory Medal. He also served in Korea where he earned the United Nations Service Medal, Korean Service Medal with one Silver Service Star and one Bronze Service Star, the American Campaign Medal and a Meritorious Unit Citation. He then spent a number of years as a heavy equipment instructor at Fort Lewis, Washington and at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri before leaving for South Vietnam. Grady began his tour of duty in Bien Hoa Province, South Vietnam on March 1, 1967 as a Heavy Construction Equipment Operator serving with A Company, 169th Engineering Battalion, 159th Engineering Group, 20th Engineering Brigade.

Grady took his own life on Christmas Eve of 1967. According to a posting by Dave Abshire, Sr. who served with Grady, "I remember Sarge very well. I was a young man 18 years old. Sarge was like a father figure to me at that time. Sometimes we would set and chat over a drink and he would tell me of some of the things he had done and seen in his time in the Army. He looked out for me and was an older friend. It was a bad Christmas that year for sure. "Sarge, if you have internet where you are and can read this, I still miss you. I didn't know things were that bad, some things you wouldn't talk about, and you were going through a tough time I know."
 

Grady Merril Jordan is the oldest person to die in Vietnam that is listed on the Vietnam Memorial in Ypsilanti Township. He lived 52 years 4 months and 29 days. He is listed under Ypsilanti. Grady is resting in the Fort Leonard Wood Post Cemetery in Pulaskey County, Missouri. His name also appears on the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, DC on Panel 32E Line 056.

The Wall rubbing by John Kinzinger

jordon
 
Dave Abshire Sr
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
A friend who was there with him.
Dunnellon, Fl 34433 United States
I Will Always Remember Sarge
I remember Sarge very well. I was a young man 18 years old. Sarge was like a father figure to me at that time. Sometimes we would set and chat over a drink and he would tell me of some of the things he had done and seen in his time in the Army. He looked out for me and was a older friend. It was a bad Christmas that year for sure. Sarge: If you have internet where you are and can read this, I still miss you. I didn't know things were that bad, some things you wouldn't talk about, and you were going through a tough time I know. May GOD Bless You. PFC Dave Abshire
Friday, October 15, 2004

The above comment from www.thewall-usa.com

View Name on Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC